Cambodia, Expat, Fashion, Food, Phnom Penh

Ladies Magazine October 2013.

Another peek into the pages, this month featuring some of my loveliest friend’s work, some awesome collaborations, and highlighting the importance of Breast Cancer Awareness for Cambodian women.

Ladies October

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Cambodia, Fashion, Phnom Penh

Ladies Magazine May.

Another issue out, a bit late posting these peeks this month!

May Cover. Semi gatefold.

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Cambodia, Fashion, Personal, Phnom Penh

Ladies Magazine, February Issue.

Alright, so here’s the lingerie spread I did for Ladies Magazine February issue.

I’m a total sucker and wanted to wait until I got my mother’s approval on the shoot before posting and was pleasantly surprised by her positive reaction.

So here it is.

Ladies, February 2013

Ladies, February 2013

"Hello, I Love You"

“Hello, I Love You”

"Until The Break of Dawn"/"Blue Heat"

“Until The Break of Dawn”/”Blue Heat”

"Pillow Talk & Bedroom Eyes"

“Pillow Talk & Bedroom Eyes”

"A Touch of Light"/"Power Moves"

“A Touch of Light”/”Power Moves”

 

 

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Cambodia, Fashion, Food, Music, Personal, Phnom Penh, Travel, United States

So This is the New Year. Written January 19th, 2013.

I sit here in an extremely air conditioned room, filled with deep dark cherry wood, Egyptian cotton bedding, the sounds of garden parties filtering through the window, the faint smell of coconut rolls and green apples in the air. The soft lights illuminate my surroundings perfectly and Jesse Morrow croons from my laptop as I type. I write from Le Meridien Hotel in Siem Reap, a delightful and unexpected getaway mixed with some business and a lot of leisure.

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Cambodia, Fashion, Phnom Penh, Travel

WUPPS!

WUPP! December 2012

The gorgeous Laura Joy Kiddle

Seems I forgot to post the articles I did for December’s WUPP! issue.

ur artist: BLACKSTAR

During one of my beginning weeks in Phnom Penh, an English woman came into my place of work and the first thing she barked at me was ‘why would you ruin yourself with those?’, waving about at my tattoos. Instead of a sharp response about her own grave state of physicality, I gave her my brightest smile and replied “because I think they’re fun.”

Opinions of tattoos go completely across the board: tacky, sexy, dangerous, ugly, exotic, cheap, beautiful, interesting…everyone is absolutely entitled to their own opinion of them. After my talks with Sun Kang, Korean tattoo master at Black Star, you may gain new perspective into the world of body modification and art.

In Korea every young man must join the army for the minimum of 2 years unless they come from extreme poverty, are severely disabled, or heavily tattooed. For this reason, tattoo parlors are illegal so that men can’t go get tattooed to avoid being drafted. Another reason tattooing is so looked down upon in Korea is if one is tattooed it usually means they have status as a gangster. As a rule of thumb, heavily tattooed individuals in Korea have spent time in prison and when are released get inked to represent the time the spent there. Sun explained that if I went to Korea and they didn’t know I was a Westerner, they would “think I’m a very, very bad girl” or be “very afraid because I am daughter of Yakuza”.

Sun began his apprenticeship with a Japanese tattoo master 17 years ago in Korea, regardless of the law. He had seen a tattooed individual and thought the piece had such beauty and artistry that he wanted to be able to create the same thing on other canvasses of skin. His passion for tattooing and their meanings are obvious and I respect the seriousness in which he takes his craft. His favorite style is traditional Japanese and although he does a fantastic job with other styles, admits he cannot do everything and will be honest about what he can and cannot do well. After two years of apprenticing with his Japanese master and practicing on his own body, as testees were obviously hard to come by, Sun opened his own secret parlor in Korea. Ninety five percent of his clientele were gangsters and the favorite piece he’s done is a full torso, chest, and arm piece on a man who had served eleven years for murder. After eleven years of tattooing in Korea, he came to Cambodia for vacation and like many of us, fell in love with the country. He decided he wanted to take a “quest” and instead of returning home, had all of his equipment shipped to Cambodia. With no English or Khmer language skills, he created an entrepreneurship here with a tattoo shop in Sihanoukville for a year with his current partners, Eddie Newman and Paul Ouk, and then moved to Phnom Penh where they have now run Black Star for 3 years.

Considering Black Star is the only tattoo shop in Phnom Penh that uses a professional grade autoclave, sanitation that passes Western standards, and the overall atmosphere of the shop is welcoming and clean one can understand why his business does so well. Foreigners make up eighty percent of his clientele and the other twenty percent are Khmer. People have come from all over Cambodia, even the world, to get tattooed by Sun and some have even called two to three months in advance to get booked for an appointment. He now has an apprentice of his own, Charly Han, who has proven to be just as skilled and interested in the craft and will continue apprenticing until he can build his own clientele. Sun enjoys his current workspace as he’s the only artist at Black Star at the moment who books many appointments and never wants to get overwhelmed to the point where he cannot perform at his highest, but may one day expand to a larger shop if he finds other artists skilled enough to join his team.

Having found such a skilled artist and interesting person, it will be a pleasure to grow my small collection of tattoos with Sun and look forward to designing my first large piece with him.

ur ride/tuk tuk of the month: Narak Kun

“Michael Phelps drives a tuk tuk”

Narak: 017 558 075

The next time you’re stressed out because you have a lunch meeting at Raffles, a hair appointment at three, need to send a dozen emails, and have cocktails with the girls at seven I’d like you to keep in mind Mr. Narak Kun.

Narak begins his day at seven, Monday through Saturday, as the assistant coach for swimming at iCAN British International School until four, then drives his tuk tuk from five until ten, maybe eleven at night. After his normal coaching schedule on Saturdays, he continues on to ICS School until three where he continues his swimming coaching.

Sundays are his day of most rest, where he coaches at Sunrise, an NGO for orphaned children, for four hours in the morning.

The desire to support his family of six in Kampong Cham moved Narak to Phnom Penh and keeps him determined to continue his more than busy schedule in hopes to one day open his own restaurant and become head coach of a competitive swimming team.

On the path he’s currently taking, I see future achievements even beyond what he may hope for. A previous member of the Cambodian National Swimming Team, competing in Thailand five times although training has been difficult in Cambodia, his drive and dedication prove him to be extremely successful in his endeavours; the boys team he coaches have been victorious in their most recent competition, placing first through third in breaststroke and the one girl he trains in second place.

Although Narak is new to tuk tuk driving having only started three months ago, he is setting up his trade professionally with business cards and although he’s only studied English for the past three years, has quite excellent understanding of the language. He is available on call, but spends most of his time near Sothearos awaiting customers. Narak’s hopes to continue his entrepreneurship are apparent and with his perseverance, I believe Phnom Penh will one day be dining at his establishment and seeing the names of his trainees on trophies.

ur shop/ Paperdolls
Brunswick Street, Melbourne. Broadway to Sixth, New York. Camden, London. Via Monte Napoleone, Italy. Street 204 ½, Phnom Penh? We may just have found the start of Phnom Penh’s street of best shopping.

Hidden away in this little alley of wonders is Paperdolls, a mashup of all things fun and whimsical in Phnom Penh’s trend driven world. This clothing and accessories hideaway holds everything from kitschy jewelry and gorgeous pop surrealism prints to filmy pastel dresses and studded clutches.

Opened recently in May 2012, branching off Dollhouse Salon, Paperdolls has quickly cultivated its own following. According to Brandon, one of the partners in this treasure trove, the established Dollhouse Salon clientele were “moaning about (the salon) not having a proper store” and “ending up at parties wearing the same dresses” as other expats.

Brandon and Ryan collaborate in the buying process, which is a perfect match according to Brandon; Ryan tends to gravitate towards the edgier and trendier and Brandon’s aesthetic appeal is toward the more practical and conservative. This blending attracts a wide base yet still keeps things interesting. Paperdolls’ goal is to source things throughout the world, from India to Colombia and Korea so that each item is one of a kind in the area. Along with keeping Phnom Penh stylish, Paperdolls’ focus is to support new designers in the area by reserving sections of the shop for designers to display their product on a commission basis. Allowing this space gets their product on a shelf in an attractive boutique, subjects them to market research, and lets customers experience the product without the designers having to expend their resources on their own shopfronts. Paperdolls makes attractive adorning accessible to everyone, so keeping price points reasonable and keeping products fresh and new is of great importance.

Make sure to keep an eye out for this partnership and I can assure you, walking out of Paperdolls emptyhanded is simply impossible.

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Cambodia, Personal, Phnom Penh, Travel, United States

November 21, 2012. Write On.

I haven’t submitted an actual writing entry since, well, it’s looking like November 11th. How impressive.

I don’t want MISCHKE BUSINESS to turn entirely into a photo blog and I really do enjoy take such pleasure in journaling via the internet, that’s really all it can be considered after assessing my writing skills and for now, that will be enough to satiate me. Eventually I’ll get either the drive, passion, determination, whatever it is that makes a dedicated blogger/writer.

I have been a bit tied up writing four articles for WUPP! Magazine’s December issue, which is actually an enjoyable task, but in the long haul they’re short pieces and I have just been slacking on tapping into my personal thoughts and getting them on paper (or Text Edit) as much as I’d like and throwing them onto WordPress. I’ll make sure to post the WUPP! articles once the December publication is released, but until then I’ll continue to jot notes to myself in hopes that I’ll remember to fully get them all out in writing at some point.

I have met a lot of writers since living here. And I mean a lot. There’s even a Mexican place, Cantina on Sisowath, where they all go on Thursday nights according to various sources. How precious; and I say that without sarcasm, like an illuminati of pencil biters and note jotters. How lovely to meet up with fellow journalists, writers, and likeminded thinkers on your strange schedule (they don’t work Fridays-Saturdays if at all depending on their freelance status) and talk shop and go over the week or just get toasted; I don’t know. I have so much admiration that these individuals could take something they genuinely are passionate about, or at least enjoy, and make careers out of it, live their lives on it. Whether writing articles for the city’s most popular lifestyle publication, freelancing for VICE magazine or on the journalism team at a well known travel magazine, I admire them with (hopefully) subtle amazement. I feel the same way even chatting with friends and acquaintances who keep up on blogging, whether at home in the states or here in Phnom Penh. It’s impressive that they continue to take the time to update daily even though they’re not being paid, sometimes feel like they have a small reader base (welcome to my life), and sometimes bare parts of their souls to the entire world that some people can’t even admit to themselves.

I find such enjoyment in hearing about the deadlines, the editing, the stress of finding a good story or even after finding said story creating a piece that will convey to readers the actual feelings the author is attempting to express. That’s probably a bit selfish on my part, taking such pleasure in their frustration, but I think part of us both know that’s all a bit of the appeal; why they do what they do. I can’t be sure and obviously its different for each individual, but writers in Phnom Penh, really writers anywhere: I applaud you.

More than that, I regard you at the utmost highest.

Here are a couple bloggers and/or friends that I enjoy keeping up on:

Giacomo Butte

Adam Isaac Jackson

Lina Goldberg

Jesse Morrow

Dear Lady Expat

Michelle Anderson 

Daniel Otis

Le Mom (Sheila Mischke)

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