Personal

To the now.

Current

Considering it’s  “Back to the Future” day I’ve done a little thinking on my…wait. Future? Past? Present? I guess I need to have a rewatching session this evening to gauge how I should be looking at today but from what I gather, everyone is comparing what we thought things would be like on October 21, 2015 and how they really are. Most are entirely disappointed that instead of hovercrafts we have Segways and that instead of self blow-drying clothes we are subjected to equally stupid Kanye West’s idea of fashion.

While almost every blog, social media platform, or girly magazine has done something similar- I’m going to list a few of the things Anna McMischke wished she would have known about today on July 3rd, 1985. Even though I hadn’t been born yet. Things are definitely different than what I had expected them to be, even five years ago, but hey- isn’t that all part of the cinematic life experience?

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Personal

Blindly.

AJ Ragasa Photography

I can’t be sure if it’s the glowing orb of a moon hanging in the sky like a bowl of gold, Barcelona radio playing in the background, skimming through my amazing nephew’s recent travel photos (Luke Mattson), or being surrounded by moving boxes again that has me feeling overwhelmed. Overwhelmed with gratitude, overwhelmed with wonder, overwhelmed with questions, overwhelmed with histrionics, overwhelmed with my surprising ability to be so surprisingly present in the simple moment of now.

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Uncategorized

Wonder.

“Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.”

It’s one of those quotes that I feel like I’ve been told more times than any normal person should be told, but again- that’s probably just me overanalyzing once again.

I haven’t completed a blog entry in some time now, I’ve started plenty, but none seem to encompass the roller coaster of a ride my life seems to be on right now. This one probably won’t either but I might as well try.

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Beauty, lifestyle, Personal

What’s in a name?

Charcoal mask

I lay on the treatment table, eyes closed with medical tape holding my bottom lashes separate from the top and a spa light glaring through my eyelids, I spoke to Kimleang as she, with surgeon like precision, applied eyelash extensions. As usual we talked about our jobs, the upcoming holiday, family, and this time- about our names. She, also Vietnamese, mentioned that my mother had told her that one of my middle names is also Kim. I knew this already, but Kimleang told me that in Vietnamese, Kim means ‘gold’ or ‘golden’.

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Cambodia, Expat, Personal, Phnom Penh

Writer’s Blockade.

haters gonna hate

To scarcely brush the surface of current political activities in Cambodia: there has been civil unrest, scare and pain tactics from both sides of political parties, army trucks with soldiers in full SWAT gear hanging on corners, widespread fear among locals and some expats, and harrowing suffering for the people of Cambodia. Not all is negative, during the time since the elections, bonds have been formed that haven’t been seen for decades and the youth, individuals aged  30 or under making up roughly 70 percent of the population- have started to push out of their shells, taking risks- sometimes unwarranted, and speaking to be heard and acting to be acknowledged. During what was supposed to be a peaceful protest last week on the Riverside in Phnom Penh, barbed wire barricades and physically harmful methods were used against the crowd. Not being in the midst of the scenes physically myself or having read the full amount of coverage, I can’t say what exactly started the violence, how things escalated, or when. What I do know is that there has been a haze of unease over the city for the past week. Last night, “police and thugs dressed in civilian clothes descended on a peaceful vigil at Wat Phnom last night, and set upon the roughly 20 protesters with slingshots, batons and electrics prods.” (Source: The Phnom Penh Post) A total of eleven were injured in the brawl and human right workers and journalists among the crowds were injured from marbles, some the size of golf balls and electric prods.

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